Regional Cuisine of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

Historical Rich Flavors | Mexican Culinary and Cultural Tour

mexican-regional-cuisine-San-Luis-Potosi

Typical cocina potosina is delicately spiced and features lots of vegetables, corn and red meat. It is the result of a fusion of indigenous and Spanish recipes. When dining in San Luis Potosi, try the following regional foods: cabuches – an appetizer made from cactus flowers; asado de boda – pork seasoned with ancho chili; zacahuil – a corn dough tamale stuffed with pork; tacos Potosinos – made with cheese or chicken served with carrots, green beans, and potatoes, sprinkled with cheese; fiambre Potosino – a mixed meat and vegetable dish in a regional sauce; gorditas de revoltillo – a stuffed corn dough snack; migadas –  a large version of gorditas. 

cabuches
cabuches

asado de boda
asado de boda

fiambre Potosino
fiambre Potosino

Try also the enchiladas potosinas, similar to small empanadas filled with cheese; the enchiladas rioverdenses, filled with potatoes and seasoned pork sausage, or the enchiladas huastecas, tortillas soaked with a spicy sauce and often filled with egg or cheese. Various dishes made with prickly pear, nopal or Mexican lime cactus are typical as well. Examples of typical cooking are found in the roast corn or fresh potato chips sold at nearly every other street corner. Restaurants in the city are more focused on their regional cuisine than any other..

Folklore includes tales, legends, beliefs, magic, herbal medicine and handicrafts, as well as the typical food, clothing, music, dances and songs of any given culture. When you travel, you surely buy some local arts and crafts and want to try the local food. By doing that, you notice that enchiladas and tamales, for example, are cooked differently from one region to another. Yet again, you may find strange and wonderful dishes such as exotic stews made with cabuches or palm tree blossoms. And what about local alcoholic beverages? You just have to try the traditional capulin, plum or jobito liqueurs!

During Holy Week, there are always countless special events, some of which go far beyond the usual religious rites of Easter. The altars of Dolores on Altamirano Street, in the state capital, are a true sample of local religious tradition, while the very solemn San Luis Potosi “Procession of Silence” is famous all over Mexico. At Easter time and on other nights of the year you must not miss the tours to El Saucito Cemetery after dark, where favorite local stories and legends are performed as plays with the dramatic backdrop of the silent tombs.

The celebration of the Day of the Dead is quite amazing, especially in the Huasteca region, because of the unique way in which they decorate the tombs at the cemeteries and because of the beautiful altars that people set up in their homes. 


SOURCE: VISITMEXICO.COM